My experiments in pie baking! Click on a photo to see different pies, and click the tiny grid on the right side of the window to see all the pies.
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My invention! A Pie Sprinkler!

My invention! A Pie Sprinkler!

As you know, traditionally you put your liquid in a cup and use a spoon to sprinkle it on the flour a bit at a time. But I was always annoyed at how the spoonful of liquid would make clumps in my dough. And I usually put ice in the liquid and it was annoying to try to keep the icy bits out of the spoonful. So I invented my little Pie Sprinkler! As you can see, I nailed some holes in a jar lid. Ta da! It works GREAT! I'm very pleased with me self.  :-)

Organic Leaf Lard

Organic Leaf Lard

I have become a fan of organic leaf lard and will never use Crisco again. I buy it online at Homestead Natural Meats; they deliver quickly and it arrives still frozen in a cooler. If you have not yet discovered the resurgence in using lard, do a search for “health benefits of lard” and you'll be amazed. This lard arrives still in the five-pound “leaf” that was wrapped around the kidneys (thank you, dear Pig, for your fat) and I have to render it myself, but that is actually pretty easy to do: just chop the leaf into small pieces, stick it in a big pot, and cook it slowly; separate the oil from the bits. I separate the oil as it renders and have found that the first jars are pure white and odorless, but as the fat cooks longer and the bits get crunchy, the lard starts getting hints of bacon smell. So I use the first jars for sweet pies and the last jars for savory pies.

I also use european butter, which is fattier than our American butter, and pie crust loves fat. So do our brains.

My flour wand!

My flour wand!

This is my favorite new gadget—you squeeze it, swipe it through the flour bucket to fill it with flour, let go of the squeeze. Then when you want a fine coating of flour on your pastry cloth or table, just squeeze and wave the wand—voilå! A lovely light coating of flour. No more piles from using my hand to throw flour on the work bench! I love this thing.

Some people call it a flour duster, but I like the hint of a magic wand. On my Pie Cookbooks page there is a direct link to Amazon to buy this great thing.

Single-serving pies

Single-serving pies

Often when making a pie there is enough dough and filling left over to make a little mini-pie that I then give away or freeze for a later dinner. La!

Single-serving pies

Single-serving pies

Often when making a pie there is enough dough and filling left over to make a little mini-pie that I then give away or freeze for a later dinner. La!

My invention! A Pie Sprinkler!

As you know, traditionally you put your liquid in a cup and use a spoon to sprinkle it on the flour a bit at a time. But I was always annoyed at how the spoonful of liquid would make clumps in my dough. And I usually put ice in the liquid and it was annoying to try to keep the icy bits out of the spoonful. So I invented my little Pie Sprinkler! As you can see, I nailed some holes in a jar lid. Ta da! It works GREAT! I'm very pleased with me self.  :-)

Organic Leaf Lard

I have become a fan of organic leaf lard and will never use Crisco again. I buy it online at Homestead Natural Meats; they deliver quickly and it arrives still frozen in a cooler. If you have not yet discovered the resurgence in using lard, do a search for “health benefits of lard” and you'll be amazed. This lard arrives still in the five-pound “leaf” that was wrapped around the kidneys (thank you, dear Pig, for your fat) and I have to render it myself, but that is actually pretty easy to do: just chop the leaf into small pieces, stick it in a big pot, and cook it slowly; separate the oil from the bits. I separate the oil as it renders and have found that the first jars are pure white and odorless, but as the fat cooks longer and the bits get crunchy, the lard starts getting hints of bacon smell. So I use the first jars for sweet pies and the last jars for savory pies.

I also use european butter, which is fattier than our American butter, and pie crust loves fat. So do our brains.

My flour wand!

This is my favorite new gadget—you squeeze it, swipe it through the flour bucket to fill it with flour, let go of the squeeze. Then when you want a fine coating of flour on your pastry cloth or table, just squeeze and wave the wand—voilå! A lovely light coating of flour. No more piles from using my hand to throw flour on the work bench! I love this thing.

Some people call it a flour duster, but I like the hint of a magic wand. On my Pie Cookbooks page there is a direct link to Amazon to buy this great thing.

Single-serving pies

Often when making a pie there is enough dough and filling left over to make a little mini-pie that I then give away or freeze for a later dinner. La!

Single-serving pies

Often when making a pie there is enough dough and filling left over to make a little mini-pie that I then give away or freeze for a later dinner. La!

My invention! A Pie Sprinkler!
Organic Leaf Lard
My flour wand!
Single-serving pies
Single-serving pies